TRUFFLE

Hidden in the ground, it has a precious and superior aroma that enriches the recipes of a cuisine that favours intense tastes

TRUFFLE: PLACE OF ORIGIN AND PROCESSING

Aromatic, preciously rare and with an unmistakable intense flavour, Truffle is a hypogeal mushroom, that is, it develops underground and lives in symbiosis with trees that herald and facilitate its presence: oaks, lindens, hazelnuts, poplars and hornbeams.

It is the ground in which it is born that determines its characteristics, aromas and shape: a soft soil usually generates a spherical truffle, while a hard, rocky soil with numerous roots will produce a knobbly shape.

There are different varieties of truffles, with each type corresponding to different areas and climatic conditions. The best known and most widely used in cooking are: Prized White Truffle, better known as Alba Truffle and harvested between September and January; Prized Black Truffle, also called “Winter Truffle” because it is harvested from November to March; Summer Black Truffle, or Scorzone Truffle, which can be found from May to December.

ORGANOLEPTIC CHARACTERISTICS

Truffle consists mainly of water, fibres and mineral salts, organic substances supplied by the tree with which it lives in complete symbiosis. Their main characteristic is having remineralizing properties, that is, they supply mineral nutrients.

USE IN THE KITCHEN

Truffle and cuisine is one of the most stimulating combinations for the palate, and necessitates sumptuous dishes precisely because of the rarity of the primary ingredient. There are no particular limits to it use, as Truffle combines well with pasta, and it becomes the touch of soft taste sensation in a risotto, on eggs and on meat.

TRUFFLE AND PASTA: THE RECOMMENDED RECIPE

When beauty becomes simple: Tagliatelle with truffles

Tagliolini and Truffle are the perfect combination

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